<Book review>

Artemis Fowl: the Arctic Incident by Eoin Colfer (2002)

Part two of the Artemis Fowl series

Uh oh! It's Artemis Fowl again. Arch Villain, but softening at the edges ... If we get another couple of volumes he'll be positively nice to know.

The story continues. Remember in the first book that Artemis was desperate to raise funds to bolster the family fortune because his father had gone missing on a trip to darkest Russia? Well, he gets the ransom demand in this book. It's going to take a lot of cash, and quite honestly, Artemis and Butler are going to need a bit of help with this one. Fairy help, possibly.

Hmmm. Artemis isn't exactly down on the list of the deserving few in the fairy books. But his sworn enemy, LEPrecon squad Captain Holly Short, is also in a bit of a pickle, and it looks as though she, and the whole of fairydom actually, are going to need a bit of help from the Mud People. So maybe they can strike a deal ...

'Do you think I like this, Captain? Do you think I relish the idea of crawling to this Mud Boy? I do not. I would rather swallow live stink worms than ask Artemis Fowl for help. But someone is powering the B'wa Kell's arms, and I need to find out who. So get with the programme, Holly. There's more at stake here than your little vendetta.'
Holly bit her tongue. She couldn't oppose the commander, not after all he'd done for her, but asking Artemis Fowl for help was the wrong course of action whatever the situation. She didn't doubt for a minute that the human would have a solution to their problem, but at what cost?

The stage is set. It's fair to say, Holly and Artemis experience a range of emotions as they work their way through their assignments. But at the end - well, they are almost fond of each other!

If you feel like a good laugh, read on ...

What can I read next?

This is the second Artemis Fowl book. If you haven't read the first, you should do!

I think you might like to have a look at the Edge Chronicles by Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell:

Not funny, but a similarly bizarre world, you could have a look at this enthralling book by Chris Wooding:

Or If you fancy another, rather more serious look at fairies, you might enjoy this one by Sally Prue:

Also, the Bookchooser has found these books with a similar profile:

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